Michael Nowakowski / NBN
For students who need to use medical marijuana, the Illinois medical program has done little, and decriminalization would be an imperceptible change.
Natalie Escobar, July 21, 2017

After two years in the position, Paul Ang is leaving his position as the coordinator of men’s engagement for the Center for Awareness, Response, and Education (CARE).

According to an email sent to members of Men Against Rape and Sexual Assault (MARS), Ang is leaving Northwestern in a “few weeks” and taking a position at the University of Minnesota. He said that there would be funding for his position moving forward, and that CARE’s assistant director Erin Clark would be leading the search to fill the position.

“I hope you all will take the opportunity to more meaningfully connect with Erin Clark,” Ang wrote in the email. “I know she is excited to hear from you all, and continue to make sure the work that MARS does is accountable to survivors, and helping to create change at Northwestern.”

Ang was the first men’s engagement coordinator at CARE, where he led male-focused groups like MARS and started the ...

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Natalie Escobar, July 14, 2017

After almost nine years in the position, Joan Slavin no longer holds the position of Title IX Coordinator or director of the Northwestern University Sexual Harassment Prevention Office.

Amanda Silva, the former deputy Title IX coordinator, has been named as the Interim Title IX Coordinator, according to University Spokesman Al Cubbage. Newly appointed Associate Vice President of Equity Dwight Hamilton will lead the search for a new Title IX coordinator without any interruptions in service, Cubbage told NBN in an email. Slavin is no longer listed on the website or in the Northwestern directory as a NU staff member, although her LinkedIn still lists the position.

“Joan Slavin, Northwestern's Title IX Coordinator, has left the University. We are grateful for her numerous contributions to the Sexual Harassment Prevention Office and our campus during the past nine years and wish her the very best in her next endeavor,” Cubbage said in a statement. An email request for comment from Slavin ...

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Justin Curto, June 1, 2017

Emily Nussbaum, the Pulitzer-winning TV critic for The New Yorker, discusses her writing with professor Nick Davis for a Contemporary Thought Speaker Series event.

Photo by Justin Curto / North by Northwestern

Many TV critics have a set of tools at the ready for their job: the 5-star rating, the genre label and yes, the top-10 list. Not Emily Nussbaum.

Nussbaum is The New Yorker’s television critic, and she rejects nearly all of these. It’s something she honed as an editor at New York magazine, where, after writing and editing so many, she eventually turned against top-10 lists and created the Approval Matrix, a “deliberately oversimplified guide” to the week in culture. It’s also led her to the 2016 Pulitzer for criticism, and it’s influenced what she called her “underlying argument about television”: Television is an art form in its own, and doesn’t need to be simplified by ratings or hierarchies.

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Libby Berry, May 25, 2017

Fans of The New Yorker, rejoice! Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic Emily Nussbaum will speak on campus June 1 as part of the Contemporary Thought Speaker Series (CTSS). The group's fifth event of the year will be held in Harris Hall 107 and feature a discussion moderated by Professor Nick Davis, who specializes in narrative cinema, starting at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A session.

For those unfamiliar with Nussbaum's work, she's been writing about television for The New Yorker since 2011, including pieces on popular shows such as Girls, Mad Men and Scandal. She won the Pultizer Prize for criticism in 2016.

“Many of us are fans of Emily’s innovative pieces for the New Yorker,” co-chair of CTSS Samantha Rose said in press release. “Her approach to TV criticism is as unique as it is enjoyable to read and her incredible taste never falters.”

Seating for the event is first-come, first-serve, and tickets are ...

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David Gleisner, May 23, 2017

According to the Kids Count Data Center, about 180,000 Chicago children live in poverty. Northwestern Dance Marathon is stepping up to help.

NUDM announced Tuesday that it has chosen Cradles to Crayons, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing low-income children with basic supplies free of charge, as its primary beneficiary for 2018.

Cradles to Crayons has been providing children ages 0-12 with items including “clothing, school supplies, toys, and much more” since 2002, first in Boston, then Philadelphia and now in Chicago, according to the organization’s website.

“Right now, poverty in Chicago is an issue that cannot go unaddressed,” said NUDM 2018 Executive Co-Chair Jamie Newman in the press release. “The support that Cradles to Crayons provides is crucial at this exact moment. It is very difficult for children to focus on school and play without pencils to use in school, books to read at home and clothing that makes each child feel confident.”

Having raised over $1 ...

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Yoonjie Park, May 22, 2017

Economics professor Mark Witte moderates a discussion led by University President Morton Schapiro and professor Gary Saul Morson.

Photo by Claire Bugos / North by Northwestern

Northwestern University President and Economics professor Morton Schapiro, along with Humanities professor Gary Saul Morson (appropriately dubbed “Morty & Morson”) discussed their forthcoming book, Cents and Sensibility, on Monday night. Over 70 people attended the event held in Harris 107, which was hosted by the NU Political Union and facilitated by economics professor Mark Witte.

Schapiro and Morson first discussed the "how and why" of their upcoming book, explaning that much of the content came from their class, “Alternatives: Modeling Choice.”

“One difference between this book and other books is that my other books I teach in class. But they don’t come from the class. 90 percent of the material in this came from the undergrads. We taught this course seven times, and it has evolved over time,” Schapiro said.

Schapiro mentioned a survey in ...

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Maggie Harden, May 17, 2017

During a brief meeting on Wednesday night, ASG senators confirmed new treasurer, Weinberg freshman Dillon Saks, and heard the A-status finance committee's funding recommendations for next year. 

A-Status Finance Committee Vice President Daniel Wu presented the committee's recommendations for funding allocation next year. The A-status finance committee is responsible for doling out nearly $1.5 million, which comes from the student activities fee students pay at the beginning of the year. This money goes toward funding over 120 events put on by 41 different groups, which range from A&O to The Dolphin Show. The committee makes its funding decisions based on how successful an event has been in the past, how inclusive the event is and how well event attendance has been historically. 

"We fund based on how well the group is able to put on events," Wu said. "We rarely fund based on speculation." 

Wu said during his presentation that most of the allocations experienced a ...

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Maggie Harden, May 17, 2017

In an email sent to students Wednesday morning, the Dean of Students Office (DOS) outlined its plan to improve the Black student experience at Northwestern. In December 2016, a task force consisting of students, faculty and staff presented their findings and recommendations to University leaders, who took that information and prioritized three main goals for the future, the email said.

The three main priorities are to increase the number of Black students, faculty and staff at Northwestern; to create an academic support hub on campus (which was part of a broader recommendation from 2015-2016 Student Demands, which can be read in full here, and a separate undergraduate experience task force); and to make a more concerted effort to listen to Black students consistently instead of just in times of crisis. To achieve these goals, the University has created three steering committees overseen by administrators including Vice President of Student Affairs Patricia Telles-Irvin and Associate Provost and Chief Diversity Officer Jabbar ...

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David Gleisner, May 16, 2017

Medill recently decided to forego renewing its accreditation from the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC), meaning the school will no longer be considered an accredited journalism program. There were a lot of big words in that sentence – here’s what they mean.

ACEJMC

The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications is “a 1990s-era accreditation organization that resists change” – according to Medill Dean Brad Hamm in an email statement sent by Dorina Rasmussen, director of the Medill Office of Student Life.

To define it more objectively, the organization independently accredits journalism schools around the country after both a self-study by the school that follows a set of guidelines and an external review by an ACEJMC-selected team. The process is voluntary and must occur every six years for a school to maintain its accreditation. This year, Medill was slated to undergo the review process again, but decided not to.

Medill’s decision

At its ...

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Maggie Harden, May 16, 2017

Photo by Maggie Harden /North by Northwestern

On Monday night, Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) hosted Palestinian human rights activist Rasmea Odeh and Dr. Nadine Naber, an associate professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago. About forty students and community members attended the event, which highlighted the struggles Palestinians have faced both in U.S. and abroad, along with the roles that sexism and homophobia play in Arab discrimination worldwide.

Odeh, who, for some, is considered a landmark figure in promoting both women’s rights and Palestinian liberation, was imprisoned by the Israeli army during the 1960s, and has testified that she was tortured and sexually assaulted while in custody. In 1969, she confessed to assisting with a bombing in Jerusalem that killed two people; however, she rescinded her confession days after and, in a 2014 immigration fraud hearing, her lawyers said that confession was coerced through physical threats and abuse. As a result of her confession, however, Odeh ...

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Rachel Frazin, May 16, 2017

Photo by Rachel Frazin/North by Northwestern

In 1970, Rasmea Odeh was convicted of terrorism for a bombing she confessed to carrying out. She later claimed she was tortured into confessing. On Monday, she spoke at at Northwestern.

Like most aspects of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, competing narratives surround Odeh’s conviction. One narrative is that Odeh confessed, was convicted and was also an alleged member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, the organization that claimed responsibility for the bombing. An observer who attended the trial from the International Red Cross deemed it fair. At her trial, evidence was also presented that police found bomb-making equipment in her room. Odeh and her supporters claim, however, that the Israeli military tortured and sexually assaulted her to coerce a confession for a crime she did not commit. They also add that the rate of conviction of Palestinians in Israeli military courts is, in some reports, over 99 percent.

Needless to ...

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Rachel Wolfe, May 11, 2017
Photos by Rachel Wolfe / North by Northwestern

Before attending “CTSS Presents: A Conversation with Zadie Smith,” students may not have known the difference between “vertical” and “horizontal” reading. They may not have considered the randomness of the country in which they were born, or the importance of imitation in writing. Leaving Ryan Auditorium on Thursday night, however, Northwestern students, faculty and staff could have been thinking about any of those topics discussed by the award-winning writer over the course of an hour and a half.

Smith’s speech was as multidimensional as her writing, but the importance of knowing one’s roots – or reading vertically – was the evening’s central theme.

African studies and comparative literature professor Michelle Wright moderated the conversation with Smith onstage, and set the tone for the evening with her first question by asking what spaces and amenities Smith needed to begin writing, to which Smith answered: “A babysitter.” The NYU professor then elaborated that she ...

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Maggie Harden, May 10, 2017

During a brief meeting on Wednesday night, ASG senators passed next year’s operating budget and President Nehaarika Mulukutla announced an upcoming town hall on NU’s new alcohol policy.

The town hall will take place on May 31 from 5:30 - 7 p.m. All students are welcome to attend to hear from various University officials such as Dean of Students Todd Adams about the new alcohol policy likely being instituted for next year, and give their input. During their campaign, Mulukutla and ASG Executive Vice President Rose Gambrah identified ending Northwestern’s dry campus policy as one of their goals, as they believe having an environment that doesn’t allow safe alcohol consumption can often push students to unsafe spaces or unsafe behaviors in order to drink.

While Northwestern is not formally a dry campus, Mulukutla explained at the meeting that drinking is frowned upon in most areas on campus and therefore students often behave as if there ...

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Justin Curto, May 10, 2017

Their first album is called Slow Dance in the Cosmos, and that’s what you’ll feel like doing (somehow, you’ll find a way) when Porches opens the Dillo Day main stage.

Mayfest will round out its Dillo lineup with the synthpop band, a project by musician Aaron Maine. Their second album, Pool, was lauded by critics, earning a coveted spot on Pitchfork’s best albums of 2016 list. Porches played sets at South by Southwest and Pitchfork Festival last year, and has toured with musician Japanese Breakfast (who performed and spoke at NU in the fall). With a sparse touring schedule this summer, Porches will open two dates for alternative pop band Belle and Sebastian alongside folk musician Andrew Bird (Music ‘96).

“Frontman Aaron Maine and his band have a mellow synth-pop sound that adds a different color different to our lineup and is definitely something that avid alternative fans can look forward to,” Mayfest said in a ...

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Alex Furuya, May 8, 2017

Photo by Alex Furuya / North by Northwestern

What happens when you get biochemists and entrepreneurs to work together? If you ask Dr. Thomas O’Halloran, the director of the Chemistry of Life Processes Institute (CLP), he’ll say, “It’s a win-win-win situation,” where researchers can get medicine to patients faster and more efficiently using an agreement called public-private partnership (P3), or an agreement between a public entity and a private corporation.

Scientists, CEOs, professors, researchers and administrators from across the Chicago area gathered at Abbott Auditorium in Pancoe Hall to talk about the progress in pharmaceutical public-private partnerships on Tuesday evening in a special forum titled “Accelerating Drug Discovery: New Approaches to Public–Private Partnerships.” Sponsored by The Center for Developmental Therapeutics in the Chemistry of Life Processes Institute and the Innovation and New Ventures Office (INVO), the event included speakers, notably Dr. Peter Schultz, the CEO and chemistry professor at The Scripps Research Institute, as well as a ...

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