Michael Nowakowski / NBN
For students who need to use medical marijuana, the Illinois medical program has done little, and decriminalization would be an imperceptible change.
Mia Zanzucchi, Nov. 13, 2017

Crowe Hall / Photo by author

Signs saying “IT'S OK TO BE WHITE” were found by two Northwestern graduate students in Crowe Hall on Saturday, according to African American Studies Department Chair E. Patrick Johnson. The students said signs were found on every floor, including seven on the fifth floor, which houses the African American Studies Department.

Besides hosting the African American Studies Department, Crowe Hall is also home to the Latina and Latino Studies Program and the Asian American Studies Program – all ethnic studies programs with histories rooted in minority student activism.

The graduate students filed reports with University Police and the Bias Incident Response Team.  At the time of publication, the University had not released a statement about the signs.

“We do not know who was responsible for posting the signs, but do know that such signs have been posted on college campuses around the country as a part of an alt-right scheme, as covered in The Washington ...

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Victoria Alfred-Levow, Nov. 12, 2017

Williams never sat down in a set full of nerdy jokes, descriptions of a wild shrooms experience and sincere commentary on marginalized storytellers. Photo by Mia Zanzucchi.

When Jessica Williams walked onto the stage of Cahn Auditorium, she saw the small stool waiting for her and proceeded to stay on her feet for an hour.

It was a telling aspect of Williams’ high-energy stand-up comedy set in Cahn Auditorium, as A&O’s fall speaker this Friday. The comedian, actress and writer took the audience of 450 on a candid journey that never stopped moving, from describing an incredible shrooms experience to urging queer people and people of color to tell their stories in any way possible.

When A&O Speakers Chair Kelly Eisenholtz introduced their speaker, she referenced Williams’ work as the youngest correspondent on The Daily Show and co-host of the podcast 2 Dope Queens. But much of Williams’ set wasn’t focused on the shows and movies ...

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Yoonjie Park, Nov. 10, 2017

On Thursday night, four Northwestern University students discussed their personal experiences with mental illness at the Stigma Panel. Over 50 people attended the event, which was hosted by NU Active Minds. Dr. Andrews, a psychologist working at CAPS and an organizer for the Movember campaign, was also present.

Eva Hernandez speaks at the panel

Photo by Morgan Lee / North by Northwestern

Eva Hernandez, one of the panelists and a senior studying neuroscience, spoke about her personal experience with depression and suicidality. She initially hid her depression, afraid that her family, friends and acquaintances would change their perceptions of her.

Hernandez discussed the two things she had learned through her experience, “The first is that it is not my fault that I’m bipolar. The second is that being bipolar doesn’t make me inferior, it’s just a part of me," she said. "I have to be strong and I have to take care of myself.”

Hernandez emphasized the significance ...

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Audrey Valbuena, Nov. 9, 2017

Photo by Audrey Valbuena/North by Northwestern

If you walked into Cahn Auditorium Thursday night, you would have seen a man on stage, flashing a red pointer at an unlabeled graph on the screen. The graph depicted a linear growth model, and you would have heard the man say “This is not how time works.”

On Sept. 9, For Members Only hosted its annual State of the Black Union address, welcoming activist Shaun King to share his insights on stage. Though it may have looked like a typical economics lecture, with graphs and symbols on the big screen, the concepts King brought up were much more complex than anything students face in Econ 201.

“This is not how time works,” said King. “We want it to work that way - we believe it to work that way. But history actually unfolds like this: sometimes human beings are amazing, and sometimes human beings suck.”

King, an activist turned journalist who was deeply ...

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Victoria Alfred-Levow, Nov. 7, 2017

Who is comedian and actress Jessica Williams? She was a correspondent at The Daily Show from 2012 to 2016. She’s set to appear in the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them sequel next November 2018. And she is coming to Cahn Auditorium this Nov. 12 as A&O’s fall speaker.

Although her old boss, Trevor Noah, visited campus recently for a New York Times discussion on race, Williams’ visit to Northwestern will likely be far less serious. A&O’s press release bills the event as a “stand-up comedy show.” A&O is sponsoring Williams in partnership with College Feminists, One Book One Northwestern and the Multicultural Filmmakers’ Collective.

Williams gets regular practice doing stand-up on her podcast, 2 Dope Queens, which she co-hosts with fellow comedian Phoebe Robinson. The program involves discussions about “sex, romance, race, hair journeys, living in New York, and Billy Joel. Plus a whole bunch of other s**t,” according to its ...

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Rachel Hawley, Nov. 3, 2017
Photo by Rachel Hawley / North by Northwestern

“First of all,” said Communication junior Lindsey Weiss to cheers and snaps as they addressed a crowd of protesters carrying signs, “fuck SAE.”

About 40 students gathered across from the Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) national headquarters on Friday afternoon for a sit-in on the lawn to protest inaction from the University on the subject of sexual assault and a culture within fraternities that propagates sexual violence.

“We’re going to occupy the space in front of SAE national headquarters to let them know that we’re here, we’re present, we are pissed the fuck off, and no matter how hard they try, they can’t ignore the fact that we exist,” Weiss said.

SAE has been the subject of controversy and public outrage on campus since February of this year, when four women reported to the Sexual Harassment Prevention Office that they had been given date-rape drugs at a party hosted by ...

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Rachel Hawley, Nov. 1, 2017

Photo by Charlotte Hu/North by Northwestern

College Republicans hosted political scientist Charles Murray on Wednesday. Murray is infamous for his book, The Bell Curve, co-authored by psychologist Richard Herrnstein, in which he argues intelligence as a primary indicator of social and economic prosperity, and writes that “it seems highly likely...that both genes and the environment have something to do with racial differences [in intelligence].”

Many prominent voices have condemned Murray's work. The Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights advocacy organization, labels Murray a white nationalist. Its website reads "Charles Murray...has become one of the most influential social scientists in America, using racist pseudoscience and misleading statistics to argue that social inequality is caused by the genetic inferiority of the black and Latino communities, women and the poor."

NUCR acknowledged this controversy with a disclaimer:

“The views invited to speak on campus are the views of the speaker, and not of Northwestern University,” said NUCR president ...

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Carlyn Kranking, Nov. 1, 2017

Screenshot of homepage of SustainNU

It seems that lately, the narrative surrounding climate change is always upsetting.

“A lot of people say environmentalists are sort of doomsayers, and essentially they’re just always depressing people,” said Keith Woodhouse, a professor in the Northwestern's Department of History and Program in Environmental Policy.

But now, Northwestern environmentalists have some good news to share.

In an effort to reduce its impact on climate change, Northwestern released its inaugural Strategic Sustainability Plan on Oct. 3. The plan outlines actions to be taken for the next five years that will allow the university to reach its goal of net zero emissions by 2050.

“Northwestern is committed to mitigating the impact of climate change, an issue our students will face for generations to come,” President Morton Schapiro wrote in an announcement emailed to students when the report was released. “By developing a comprehensive plan for the next five years of environmental stewardship at Northwestern, we ...

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Yoonjie Park, Oct. 31, 2017

NTW Non-Tenure Eligible Faculty Union (NU NTE Faculty Union) and students gathered at The Rock this afternoon, demanding that President Morton Schapiro negotiate with the Faculty Union. The rally, held as part of the National Campus Equity Week, drew a crowd of over 60.

Protesters held posters with slogans such as “Unmasking the Rigged Economy on Campus” and “Justice for Students Affordable, Quality Education." Some supporters also wrote their own signs, expressing “Solidarity with Faculty” and “NU Grad Workers Support NU Non-Tenured Faculty Right to Bargain”.

Paige Warren speaks at the rally

Photo by Yoonjie Park

Non-tenure faculty at Northwestern have formed a union that is not recognized by the University. The purpose of the rally was to raise awareness and pressure the University to the negotiating table, according to Aaron Norton, a visiting assistant professor in Gender & Sexuality Studies and Sociology at Northwestern. The labor union's main goal is to secure longer contract appointments for those with temporary ...

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Maggie Harden, Oct. 31, 2017

Last night, Hillel announced actor and comedian Josh Peck as its fall speaker. Peck is most famous for his role as Josh Nichols on Nickelodeon sitcom Drake & Josh (and his iconic quote, "Hug me, brotha!"), but Peck also made a name for himself as a Vine and YouTube star. Before you see him speak next week, here are some clips from his long career as an actor and comedian to get you in the ~mood~. 

1. Drake & Josh #tbt

When Peck got 2 milion followers on YouTube, he compiled a celebratory highlight reel of some of his most famous Drake & Josh quotes. Highlights include: "Megan!" and "It's spherical!"

2. When you forget to lock the bathroom door

This Vine perfectly captures the pure, unadulterated fear of when you realize you forgot to lock the door behind you and now you regret everything. 

3. Peck's first-ever vlog

When Peck got married in June to his wife Paige O'Brien ...

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Justin Curto, Oct. 26, 2017

To get to their Contemporary Thought Speaker Series panel, Wesley Morris, Doreen St. Felix and Rembert Browne took an Uber. During their ride, they got to talking about their experiences in culture journalism – and during their panel on culture journalism, they got to talking about ride-booking services like Uber.

“I don’t want to have to rate the experience!” Morris, a New York Times critic-at-large, said about in-app ratings. (Uber and Lyft notoriously value five-star ratings for their drivers.) “I’m a critic! My whole life has been about trying to find a way to get away from a rating system – and now I can’t get out of a fucking cab without having to leave a rating!”

The outburst came from Morris talking about the three-star rating he gave a Lyft driver, and the call he got from Lyft afterward. He said the ride was “fine,” to which Browne, a freelancer formerly on staff at Grantland and New York ...

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Maggie Harden, Oct. 26, 2017

College Republicans announced author Charles Murray and Forbes Media editor-in-chief Steve Forbes as their fall speakers on Thursday night. Murray, who authored controversial book The Bell Curve, will speak on Wednesday, Nov. 1, and Forbes, who was a Republican presidential candidate in 1996 and 2000, will speak on Monday, Nov. 6.

Murray's The Bell Curve, which was published over twenty years ago, received a lot of criticism for its contention that Black people score lower on average on IQ tests than white people (and consequent implication that people can infer someone's intelligence based on their race). While the book's primary argument is that American society is becoming stratified according to class differences, its work on analysis on race data was its most prominently discussed aspect. Murray has written several books since, including New York Times bestseller "Coming Apart" in 2012. He is also a W.H. Brady Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank ...

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Rachel Hawley, Oct. 25, 2017

On Tuesday, Oct. 24, members of the Northwestern Interfraternity Council (IFC) voted to derecognize Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) until 2021, citing a pattern of actions that “have continued to make the Northwestern community less and less safe.”

In February of this year, the Sexual Harassment Prevention Office received a report detailing an allegation from four female students who believed they were given a date-rape drug at the SAE fraternity house, two of whom also reported having been sexually assaulted. In light of the allegations, IFC chose to suspend all social events indefinitely. While the University chose not to take action against SAE after concluding their investigation in March, the chapter was suspended in April after the University concluded that it had violated the terms of a disciplinary probation by hosting social events with alcohol.

According to a statement released by IFC on Facebook earlier today, members of SAE displayed behaviors “unbecoming of a chapter in the IFC.” Specifically, IFC cites ...

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Rachel Oh, Oct. 24, 2017

Larry Summers, the former Secretary of Treasury and President Emeritus at Harvard University, spoke at the Susan Bies Lecture at the Global Hub on Wednesday, Oct. 18. About 220 students came to the lecture, including 20 students who were on the waitlist for the event. The invite-only lecture was open to economics faculty, Ph.D. students, and undergraduate students, as well as Kellogg faculty and MBA students.

The annual Susan Bies Lecture has been held since 2008 in honor of Susan Schmidt Bies, Northwestern alumna, on various economics topics. This year’s lecture featured Summers in conversation with Janice Eberly, professor of Finance at Kellogg School of Management and the former Assistant Secretary of Treasury, followed by a Q&A session.

Having served as Secretary of Treasury in the Clinton administration and as the Director of the White House National Economic Council in the Obama administration, Summers spoke about approaching economic issues as a policymaker.

“My view is, you build ...

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Natalie Escobar, Oct. 22, 2017

When Sekile Nzinga-Johnson arrived for her first days at the new director of the Women’s Center in mid-September, things started casually enough. She met with the three other staff members for lunch, as they all got to know who would be sharing the house on 2000 Sheridan Road.

“It’s Big Brother, Northwestern edition, you know?” she joked.

Over these past few weeks, though, she’s spent her time learning the history of the Women’s Center – both the positive and the negative, she said. Her arrival coincides with the 30th anniversary of the center, marking decades full of programming and services for women-identified people and other marginalized groups on campus. But Nzinga-Johnson quickly learned the controversies that she would be inheriting, particularly the restructuring of the feminist counseling services that were absorbed by CAPS. Now, she has been tasked with imagining what the next 30 years at the center will look like.

“While we might have been restructured ...

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