Michael Nowakowski / NBN
For students who need to use medical marijuana, the Illinois medical program has done little, and decriminalization would be an imperceptible change.
Natalie Escobar, Dec. 4, 2016

Last Winter Quarter, a few hundred faculty members received an email from labor organizers asking a seemingly simple question: would they, as non-tenure-eligible faculty at Northwestern, be interested in joining a labor union?

Since then, a battle over unionization has been playing out almost entirely out of sight from the student body. The debates have taken place behind closed doors, over email and even in a faculty-members-only Facebook group for discussing the vote. 

One thing that every non-tenure-eligible faculty member seems to agree on, though, is that unionizing would somehow fundamentally affect their status at the university. To some, the debate has raised even larger questions. Why are some professors so invested in having this union at Northwestern? What role does tenure play at a university and an academic world that relies more than ever on adjunct faculty to teach its students? And what will the future of teaching at Northwestern look like if the power balance between faculty and ...

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David Gleisner, Nov. 30, 2016

Amidst a smattering of tables in Allison Dining Hall, four microphones stood above the crowd, providing a platform for NU students and faculty to converse about diversity course requirements, course affordability and faculty training.

ASG and Faculty Senate came together to host their first Community Dialogue of the academic year Wednesday, allowing students the opportunity to verbalize frustrations and questions on subjects of diversity and inclusion in the classroom at Northwestern.

Associate Provost for Diversity and Inclusion Jabbar Bennett moderated the discussion, leading off by introducing the areas of discussion and setting the ground rules for the event: anyone who wishes to speak should step up to the microphone nearest to them, and anyone not speaking should respectfully listen.

This was the fifth Community Dialogue put on by the two groups, and is a relatively new opportunity for students and faculty to directly interact in a setting conducive to inciting change.

“The Community Dialogues began last year, specifically during the ...

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Justin Curto, Nov. 21, 2016

Northwestern just announced Jonathan Holloway will become the University’s new provost July 1, 2017. Here’s everything you need to know:

Who’s the new provost?

Jonathan Holloway is the dean of Yale College, the undergraduate college of arts and sciences at Yale University. He’s also the Edmund S. Morgan Professor of African American Studies, History and American Studies, and he has been involved in Yale’s residential college system too. Holloway earned his doctorate at Yale, but he began his academic career by teaching at the University of California, San Diego, for five years.

Who’s he replacing?

The current provost, Dan Linzer, will leave June 30, 2017, after 10 years in the position. Before he was provost, Linzer had been the dean of Weinberg for five years, and was associate dean previously. He started working in molecular biosciences at Northwestern in 1984. Linzer also studied at Yale – he earned his bachelor’s degree there, but his ...

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David Gleisner, Nov. 17, 2016

What now?

Seven days after the election that shook America to its core, about 50 Northwestern students packed into a small classroom to answer that question, concluding a week of protests, meetings and events on and around Northwestern’s campus.

The election of Donald J. Trump shocked many members of the Northwestern community. His extreme positions on a variety of topics are antithetical to many of the beliefs of students on campus. The emotional response exhibited by the student body included disbelief, fear, grief and uncertainty, among other sentiments.

Events began as soon as the election wrapped up last Tuesday night into early Wednesday morning. Students gathered at the Lakefill after the results had been finalized to provide support to one another and verbalize their emotions in a community setting, surrounded by the tears and hugs of their peers.

“The Lakefill vigil was definitely a rough place to be; people were in various stages of denial that something like this ...

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Justin Curto, Nov. 17, 2016

No one wanted to motion to extend yesterday’s ASG meeting past 10 p.m., but someone had to.

The wide-ranging meeting would end up being three hours and 15 minutes long. Among other business, ASG senators presented a bill that would call for Northwestern to be declared a sanctuary campus in the wake of Donald Trump’s election as president. The bill responds to a student petition created in the wake of Donald Trump’s election as president.

The term “sanctuary campus” comes from the concept of sanctuary cities, cities that have pledged not to report or prosecute undocumented immigrants for breaking immigration law. Chicago and Evanston are both sanctuary cities, according to the bill.

CNN reports that over 80 college campuses are now considering declaring themselves sanctuary campuses in response to Trump. The president-elect has pledged to deport two to three million undocumented immigrants and infamously referred to them as “murderers” and “rapists” during his campaign.

There are ...

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Maggie Harden, Nov. 16, 2016

Northwestern alumna Terry O'Neill speaks about the history of the National Organization for Women (NOW), where she currently serves as president.

Photo by David Gleisner / North by Northwestern

On Wednesday night, long-time feminist lawyer and NU alum Terry O’Neill spoke to an audience of about 50 students, faculty and Evanston residents about the importance of women mobilizing against president-elect Donald Trump.

O’Neill is the president of the National Organization for Women (NOW), as well as a former attorney and law professor, and addressed the majority-female audience with a passionate call to action.

“Our country has turned a corner, and we need to be very clear-eyed about what’s happening,” O’Neill said. “There is no sugar-coating what 67 percent of white men and 53 percent of white women [who voted for Trump] just did to us.”

During her speech, O’Neill emphasized the importance of intersectionality, or considering how gender intersects with other facets of identity like ...

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David Gleisner, Nov. 10, 2016

Many Northwestern students left Tuesday’s election full of anger and fear; ASG acknowledged this, and created a space to talk about it.

ASG hosted a post-election gathering Thursday in the Louis Room in Norris University Center, giving students an opportunity to voice their thoughts, opinions and emotions regarding the election of Donald J. Trump as President of the United States.

About 30 students partook in the event as ASG president Christina Cilento took the microphone to introduce it, leading the formation of a large circle in which students could share their thoughts and feelings in an open format if they were willing.

“I think there’s a very palpable emotionally unstable state that we wanted to be able to provide for,” Cilento said. “It was just meant as an open space for students to come together.”

Many students found out about the event through an email from Patricia Telles-Irvin, the Vice President of Student Affairs, which offered the gathering ...

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Petra Barbu, Nov. 9, 2016
“What do we want? Freedom! When do we want it? Now! If we don’t get it? Shut it down.” This rallying cry sounded across downtown Chicago on Wednesday afternoon, with Trump Tower looming over thousands at the Emergency Protest in Chicago. The message was clear: say no to Trump, say no to racism. Unfortunately, it was too little, too late. A Facebook event called “Point and Laugh at Trump Tower” was scheduled for today, with the expectation that Trump would lose and this lighthearted event could mark the end of a polarizing campaign. Instead, thousands flooded the streets of Chicago, not to point or laugh, but to march and shout in bitter opposition to the results of the election and what it stands for.

Photos by author

In her concession speech earlier this morning, Hillary Clinton implored Democrats to “make sure your voices are heard going forward.” The students, parents, teachers and citizens at Trump Tower did just this ...

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Maggie Harden, Nov. 9, 2016

#NoDAPL has become a serious issue for many different groups on campus. Almost 100 students participated in Northwestern’s #NoDAPL rally on Indigenous Peoples’ Day, and several participated in an anti-DAPL march with three other Chicago universities on Friday, Nov. 4 – an event that started on Facebook and caught on across Chicago. Protests have broken out nationwide and have grown increasingly contentious as activist arrests continue to grow, currently totaling over 140. So, let’s talk about how students here can help combat the wide-reaching implications this pipeline might have.

What is DAPL?

The Dakota Access Pipeline, or DAPL, is a proposed underground oil pipeline that would transfer over 450,000 barrels of crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois. Originally, it was planned to cross through the Missouri River north of Bismarck, but was rerouted partially because of potential threats to Bismarck’s water supply.

However, the rerouted pipeline now goes through the Standing Rock Sioux (comprised of the ...

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Lila Reynolds, Nov. 8, 2016

The Global Strategy Task Force published their final report on Friday, giving feedback and suggestions to the University about how to become one of the “World’s Premier Universities” by 2020, including plans to establish three new locations by 2020 and increasing global marketing.

Nearly 18 months ago, a group of 12 Northwestern faculty and administrators convened to reimagine how the university engages globally. Last Friday, following research and input from 300 faculty, students, staff and alumni from around the University as well as many others from peer institutions, the task force released their final report, which gives nine major recommendations regarding Northwestern’s global vision.

Sally Blount, the dean of Kellogg and one of the force’s co-chairs, said she is optimistic that the university is putting more emphasis on global funding and adding new locations.

“I am really excited as Kellogg Dean that the University is going to start investing in global sites,” said Blount. “Because I’ve ...

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David Gleisner, Nov. 7, 2016
Images by Author / North by Northwestern

The view of Lake Michigan from the top of Evanston’s tallest building wasn’t the only incentive for Chicagoans to climb hundreds of steps early on a Sunday morning.

Prevention, Education, Evaluation, Recovery (PEER) Services held its second annual Step Up for Recovery stair climb Sunday morning at Orrington Plaza, inviting 150 participants from the Chicagoland area, including a number of Northwestern students, to climb 20 stories to raise awareness and funds for the nonprofit organization.

For the past 40 years, PEER has aided those in Chicago’s North suburbs affected by substance abuse, and today, advocacy and prevention help shape their focus.

“One of our huge goals is to change people’s attitudes about addiction,” said Jenny Phan, NU alum and Development Coordinator for PEER Services. “One of the goals of the stair climb is to make it okay for people to come out and say that this is a problem that ...

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Meghan Harshaw, Nov. 4, 2016

Cake from Red Dress Gala 2015/ Courtesy of Justin Barbin

This week’s unusually warm weather wasn’t the only thing encouraging students to be active. Alpha Phi’s Heart Health Week hosted two workout events and a shopping event to fundraise for the Alpha Phi Foundation, which provides funding for women’s heart health and cardiac research.

Communication senior Jennie Dopf, the chapter president, started the annual fundraising week last year after getting the idea from her friends in Alpha Phi at Washington University in Saint Louis.

“I felt like we didn’t have enough philanthropy events going on on campus during fall or winter, since Red Dress Gala is mainly for parents,” said Dopf, who was vice president of marketing at the time. “Last year, we had a treadmill that we brought to the Rock, and we decided not to do that this year since we didn’t think it was necessarily showing how we care about heart ...

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Justin Curto, Nov. 3, 2016

There were few words Lupe Fiasco never said during his talk at a packed Galvin Hall on Thursday.

The rapper talked about his faith in Islam, and how being Black affects being Muslim. He talked about hip-hop music. But he also talked about his childhood, OCD, sex, technology, Chicago, partying and the media.

The Muslim Cultural Students Association brought Fiasco, a Chicago native, to campus as its Fall Keynote. Fiasco gave a talk called “Informing Faith,” and then joined Amirah Sackett, a Chicago-based hip-hop artist and teacher, for a question-and-answer session on a range of topics.

Before he started his talk, Fiasco loosened the crowd up with a joke: “Why did the sheik go to McDonald’s to break his fast? Because he heard they do maghrib [a prayer that sounds like McRib] there.”

Fiasco made clear from the start that he was there to talk about only his faith. He said he wanted to give a picture of his ...

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Maggie Harden, Nov. 2, 2016

In a brief pre-World Series Game Seven game meeting on Wednesday night, ASG confirmed its nomination for a new co-VP of student life and explained legislation for a new ad hoc committee on mental health. The former co-VP of student life, Sumaia Masoom, stepped down to tend to her own mental health two weeks ago, and ASG unanimously nominated sophomore Ben Powell to fill the vacant position.

Powell has been in ASG since he was a freshman, and has already been involved with a number of projects relating to student life--most notably a campaign with NU Real Foods to bring grocery store items to convenience stores across campus. He said he hopes to take the lessons he’s learned from his past projects to his new role.

“I’ve gotten to see the hard work students are doing to improve campus,” Powell said, “and I’ve also gotten to see the real institutional challenges ASG has in helping these students ...

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Justin Curto, Oct. 31, 2016

It may have Chicago in its name, but the Chicago Humanities Festival found a new home in Evanston Oct. 29, on the festival’s Northwestern Day.

The festival occurs annually, bringing dozens of speakers and performers to the Chicago area throughout October and November. Northwestern Day included 15 talks and presentations by a variety of writers, performers and scholars. Maureen Dowd, a columnist for The New York Times, and David Axelrod, the director of the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics and former Obama advisor, kicked off Saturday’s talks, and California Sen. Barbara Boxer and Chicago Tonight correspondent Elizabeth Brackett closed out the day. Additionally, three University professors held CHF events.

If you couldn’t make it to any of the day’s festivities, no worries – NBN has you covered with recaps of Newberry Medal-winning author Kwame Alexander’s talk, Yale Sterling Professor of Law Akhil Reed Amar’s presentation, and a panel led by Communication Studies professor ...

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