Lila Reynolds, May 25, 2016

In the beginning of April, McCormick junior Marc Gyongyosi traveled to one of the biggest conferences in the computing industry, the Graphics Processing Unit Technology Conference. The conference covers innovation from self-driving cars to robots to GPU gaming.

Unlike most students at the conference, however, Gyongyosi was not just a bystander. He went with Kellogg student Justin Saeheng to present about the company they co-founded, Intelligent Flying Machines (IFM).

The two, in short, have created small drones that can fly without any controllers. While this feat by itself has been developed in the past, nobody cracked the code in creating autonomous drones that can operate indoors until Gyongyosi and Saeheng began development.

Gyongyosi and Saeheng, the CEO and COO respectively, founded the company in the fall after researching breakthroughs in drone technology and noticing a trend in a particularly challenging part of already complicated technology. The two say they made a great match: Gyongyosi built flying things in his basement ...

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Jason Mast, May 25, 2016
Photo by Michael Nowakowski / North by Northwestern

For thousands of Illinois residents with disabilities, Monday, November 9, 2015, was a panacea years in the making. Dozens of marijuana dispensaries opened their doors, as the state launched its medical marijuana program after two years of government planning and years more of citizen advocacy. And despite some rough patches in the rollout, Illinois may soon take another step as the State House passed a bill May 18 that, with Gov. Bruce Rauner’s approval, could decriminalize the drug under state law. 

Yet for college students diagnosed with a condition that warrants the use of medical marijuana, the medical program has done little, and decriminalization would be an imperceptible change. Under a 27-year-old law, colleges risk losing federal funding if they don’t prevent the use of drugs listed as controlled substances by the federal government. Despite the state of Illinois’ relaxed regulations, marijuana remains a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning that the ...

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Rachel Frazin, May 25, 2016

The 2017 Dance Marathon primary beneficiary will be Gigi’s Playhouse, which, according to a press release from NUDM, “provides free therapeutic programming and support to individuals with Down syndrome.”

The charity operates in the United States and Mexico and has served over 25,000 people. According to the Gigi’s Playhouse website, ”All programs aim to maximize self-confidence and empower individuals to achieve their greatest potential.”

The money raised by DM will support the charity’s speech and language program, which aids participants in reading and math. It will also help fund a pilot program called Mobile Playhouse which will attempt to make Gigi’s Playhouse more accessible to underserved communities. 

“More than 400,000 people in the U.S. have Down syndrome, and we are beyond excited that NUDM has the opportunity to help improve the lives of these incredibly inspiring people,” Ian Pappas, NUDM 2017 Executive Co-Chair said in the press release.

This year’s Hero Program ...

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Lila Reynolds, May 25, 2016
photo by author
Photo by author

Broadcast journalist and Libertarian pundit John Stossel spoke on Tuesday night as the Northwestern University College Republicans spring speaker. His discussion focused on why a strong economy protects an individual’s rights better than a strong government. He was joined in Leverone Hall by about 100 attendees, ranging from Northwestern students to Chicagoland Libertarians.

While the title of the event was “Freedom and its Enemies,” Stossel said that as a young reporter, “I was an enemy of freedom without realizing it.”

He explained this, saying that when he was young as he looked into the unfairness of capitalism, he felt the government’s job should be to protect people. He won Emmys for producing work exposing businesses he felt cheated people.

“I had this world vision of government making the world better, and what’s the alternative?” said Stossel. “I was woefully ignorant.”

However, after years of reporting on the topic and being exposed to different viewpoints ...

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Kayla Reardon, May 24, 2016

Should U.S. universities remove race-based affirmative action from their admissions procedures? This was the topic Northwestern students debated on Monday night in the Buffett Institute for an event that was co-sponsored by the Northwestern University Political Union and the Northwestern University Asian Pacific American Coalition.

The affirmative side’s opening statement, delivered by Weinberg freshman Jose Trejos, argued that people can game the system when it comes to affirmative action. He argued that affirmative action was biased towards upper class minorities, focuses on issues that don’t necessarily help minority students, and allows for less-qualified students to get into top universities.

“Affirmative action’s primary purpose was to create more colorful admissions pamphlets,” Trejos said. Trejos also specified that he was not against all types of affirmative action. In fact, they felt that affirmative action in terms of income would do enough to support minority groups.

The negative side agreed that there were problems with the way affirmative action ...

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North by Northwestern Staff, May 24, 2016
If you're reading this, you're probably stressing out about your housing situation in the fall as a new student, or you at least remember what it was like to glean through the blindingly long list of possible housing options. NBN is here to help you figure it all out. Check out our 2016 Housing Guide for videos and photos, resident quotes, walking distances and more.

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Maie Zagloul, May 22, 2016

Warning: this article contains the mention of astronaut ice cream, a matrix and a lot of science. Proceed at your own risk.

Space Ice, a team of researchers from McCormick's Dunand Research Group, is dedicated to manufacturing products for space as well as perfecting manufacturing techniques for astronauts, recently obtained a grant from NASA for collaboration with University of Illinois Urbana Champaign and Bradley University. The grant will be used for the study of freeze-casting, a common technique for creating materials in outer space, to make pretty much anything ranging from cocoa tablets to fuel cells.

The project is sponsored through NASA’s Office of Education, whose goals was to have undergraduate students work on science that is relevant to NASA while providing a platform to train students in the real world.

The project consists of a collaboration between the three universities, with three different subteams: an engineering team, a science team and a journalism team, which is in ...

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Jordan Friedman, May 19, 2016

Northwestern, the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern (ISEN) and Exelon Corporation, a Fortune 150 energy company, announced an initial five-year research partnership on Monday, May 16. The partnership will be focused on clean energy innovations.

With Exelon’s market expertise and Northwestern’s research capabilities, the partnership sets up a streamlined process of bringing innovations and technology from the lab to commercial use.

“At Exelon, identifying technologies that are about to emerge and then capitalizing on them – rather than reacting to them – is at the core of our mission and strategy to better serve customers,” Exelon spokesperson Paul Adams said. “Our partnership with Northwestern University is a key part of this strategy and will help us identify and develop innovations that will help us improve the reliability of the power grid and advance the transition to clean energy.”

Michael Wasielewski, ISEN’s executive director, said the first project is partnering to design and build an energy efficient house ...

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Lila Reynolds, May 19, 2016

The idea for a company called NoteShark formed in the entrepreneurial arm of the Institute for Student Business Education, almost a year and a half ago when Medill then-freshman Derrick Lee found himself in a class that expected him to read more than 200 pages a night.

Wishing he had both an idea for a business pursuit and a way to manage all his work, Lee found a way the two could be in sync. With his friend McCormick then-freshman Wyatt Cook, the two formed NoteShark, a user-friendly, student-centric site that allows Northwestern students to buy and sell notes for difficult classes.

“I think people recognize but don’t address that a lot of student groups like Greek organizations or professional groups have drop boxes of material that they share with each other,” Lee said. “But there’s a lot of people that don’t have access to those kinds of things, so we want to give more access to ...

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Jordan Friedman, May 18, 2016

New business brought forward at ASG Senate on Wednesday night raised questions of clarification in regard to talks about open admissions policies for student groups on campus.

President of Delta Sigma Pi Kathir Sundarraj introduced a resolution that stated the Northwestern student body is against the proposed student organization admissions policies. He gave myriad explanations for the resolution, including his assertion that it may “shut down or dilute experiences.”

Sundarraj continued to explain that many students recognize the problems, but that there are other ways to solve the issue of inclusion on campus. During the questioning period, Brent Turner, the executive director of Campus Life, addressed some clarifications.

“There is no mandate and no policy,” Turner said, explaining that a recent Daily Northwestern article about the proposed policy was “a student’s narrative of my words.”

Turner said he stands by the accuracy of his quotes, but that the wrong message came across in the article.

“I think that readers ...

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Rachel Frazin, May 18, 2016

Correction appended May 19 9:09 a.m.

When Huffington Post Senior Political Reporter and Politics Managing Editor Amanda Terkel called a Medill professor, she thought it would be a routine reference check. However, when she asked about a potential intern’s writing ability, she said the professor told her that most undergraduates are poor writers. She said he also added that because she sounded young, she was likely a bad writer as well.

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Ashwin Kulkarni, May 18, 2016

William Xiao, a McCormick junior studying computer science, has developed Regal, CAESAR’s first Chrome Extension, making the outdated website a lot more user friendly. Xiao said about 400 users have already downloaded the Regal software since it was released on May 10 as a free extension on the Chrome web store. Xiao, who is on the executive board of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), initially created the Regal software to make navigating CAESAR easier for himself, but decided to release the extension for the entire Northwestern community just in time for fall quarter registration. North by Northwestern spoke with Xiao about Regal, why he created it, and how it will make your CAESAR experience less painful.

NBN: Why is your Chrome extension called Regal?

WX: I originally was going to call the software CAESAR plus plus relating it a pun to the programming language C++, but I scrapped that because it was too long. I decided ...

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Jason Mast, May 17, 2016
Photos by Mia Zanzucchi / North by Northwestern

“Where are you really from?"

The seemingly innocuous questions is a common one, often directed at Asian Americans. But what might seem like a matter-of-fact inquiry actually implies something more derogatory. “It’s fundamental racism,” said Professor of Asian American Studies Ji-Yeon Yuh, “the assumption that is if you are Asian, you de facto don’t belong.”

The question was the subject and the title of a panel discussion on Tuesday night. Students filled almost every seat of Fisk 217 to hear three Northwestern Asian American Studies professors discuss Asian American’s relationship to Black Lives Matter, the history of Asian American identity and their future within a globalized capitalist world.

Associate professor of anthropology and Asian American Studies Shalini Shankar explained how the question exists alongside other subtly racist slights that are today labeled as "micro-aggressions," but that have long existed. She recalled seeing discrimination against bilingual speakers and people mocking Asian ...

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Clare Varellas, May 17, 2016

WNUR officials announced today that Akenya, Colleen Green, Mister Wallace, Smino and Derrick Carter will perform on the WNUR stage during Dillo Day this coming Saturday, May 21, in that order.

The group of artists, whose music genres include a diverse combination of pop rock, jazz, rap and house, will begin performing at 12:30 p.m. on the festival’s second stage, reserved solely for WNUR acts. They’ll perform simultaneously with the Mayfest-organized mainstage acts, providing students with a “different dimension” of music at the festival, as WNUR general manager Maddie Higgins said.

“We want to showcase the awesome talent we have in Chicago and we want to make sure they’re getting some shine so people can hear people they may not have heard of before,” said Higgins. “We always want to balance bringing artists that are underrepresented.”

Festivities will begin with jazz-influenced musician Akenya, who will be accompanied by her entire band. She has been well-known ...

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Rachel Frazin, May 16, 2016
Photo by Mia Zanzucchi / North by Northwestern

Former Northwestern President Henry Bienen and John E. Rielly, president emeritus of the Chicago Council of Global Affairs, debated President Barack Obama’s foreign policy on Monday at an event put on by Northwestern University Political Union.

Rielly spoke in favor of Obama because of his action in various situations, such as ending the pariah status the United States had before coming into office. He said Obama bettered the situation he inherited.

“Two-thirds of Germans said in 2007 that the United States was a greater threat to the peace of the world than Iran,” he said.

He also praised the president for negotiating the Iranian Nuclear Deal, killing Osama Bin Laden, imposing sanctions on Russia, continuing engagement with China while working to reduce China’s carbon emissions and restoring Cuban relations. He said Obama “saved the world from a financial crisis.”

Bienen critiqued the president because of his lack of military action against ...

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