Flordia elections headed for recount
By

    Recount. Florida. For anyone old enough to be a voter in the 2000 presidential election, those words should evoke abject horror and memories of the month-long period of uncertainty that haunted the nation through multiple court appeals.

    Now though, a new generation of voters may have the chance to experience the suspense of a recount, once again in, you guessed it, Florida. Thankfully, hanging chads will not be a factor.

    On Election Night, Republican candidates appeared to eke out a narrow victory in the Sunshine State in both the Senate and gubernatorial races. Votes are still being counted, though, and the margins in both races are razor-thin, even by Florida standards, and still narrowing. According to CNN, the initial vote count in the state won’t be finalized until Nov. 10 at noon, and a recount occurs automatically within a margin of 0.5 percent.

    Accordingly, incumbent Senator Bill Nelson has called for a recount in his race, though a candidate request is not necessary to trigger the process. Former Florida Governor Rick Scott’s margin of victory currently stands at a mere 0.4 percent, 50.2 to 49.8, with 100 percent of precincts reporting, and the Associated Press reporting the race as too close to call.

    The AP has, however, called the gubernatorial race for Republican Ron DeSantis, the controversial Trump-endorsed former congressman. Despite that, his margin of victory has continued to shrink, and currently stands less than a tenth of a percent outside of the threshold for an automatic recount.

    Democratic gubernatorial nominee Andrew Gillum conceded the race on the night of the election, but has nonetheless indicated that he is open to a recount.

    Whether or not such a recount will occur in the Gillum-DeSantis race is still an open question as votes continue to be counted, but Florida state law dictates that a Nelson-Scott recount go forward. The results of the recount will be due at 3 p.m. EST on Nov. 15.

    Comments

    blog comments powered by Disqus
    Please read our Comment Policy.